2.jpg

MALF Blog

Minnesota Association of Library Friends

Compile Those Evy Nordley Materials Now!

Posted by jim on April 20, 2018

MALF is now accepting entries for its flagship Friends prize, the annual Evy Nordley Award for Best Project. You have until Friday June 15 to submit your application(s).

As in years past, any Friends-supported project can be considered. Examples include programming and fundraisers, advocacy or membership campaigns, a new website or publication, or outstanding community collaborations. Efforts jointly sponsored or developed with the library (or another public agency) are eligible, provided that the library or Friends of the Library was the primary beneficiary of the effort. Current MALF membership is also a prerequisite for consideration.

Applicants will be considered by a MALF judging panel this summer. Finalists will be asked to join us at the 2018 Minnesota Library Association conference in Saint Cloud (October 11-12) and give a ten-minute presentation on their project. Top prize, announced at MLA, is $1,000 and a custom commemorative plaque!


Click here for further details on the Evy Nordley Award’s purpose and history, eligibility criteria, and applicant recommendations. Click here to access the application. Good luck!

*VIRTUAL* Library Legislative Day 2018

Posted by jim on April 16, 2018

As you may already have heard, National Library Legislative Day 2018 is scheduled for May 7-8. Like in years past, MALF is proud to have a representative on the ground to participate in the American Library Association’s slate of events and meet with members of Minnesota’s congressional delegation.

Legislative Day is held – where else? – in Washington D.C. ALA understands that, due to cost constraints and scheduling availability, most library advocates cannot attend NLLD in person. Fortunately, you can still participate: in Virtual Library Legislative Day... In point of fact, there’s no excuse not to take part! Simply pledge to do one or more of the following:


• Email or call your senators and representative, on or around May 8;
 Make an appointment to meet with your congressmen, when they are next home;
 Organize a talk or demonstration to bring attention to library issues in your hometown;
 Promote Virtual Library Legislative Day within your personal network, and on social media (using hashtag #NLLD18).

Click here to learn more, and click here to fill out an ALA “pledge card.”

How Friends Attract Younger Donors, Pt. 2

Posted by jim on April 02, 2018

MALF is pleased to present this three-part miniseries on Millennial donors, adapted with permission from a piece originally prepared by and for Library Strategies, our office management firm. We've heard from you, our members, that this is a topic of great and increasing importance.

Tip 3: Encourage Online Giving. Watch Mobile Giving.

Fifteen years ago, checks accounted for 46 percent of all non-cash transactions. By 2012, that figure had dwindled to just 15 percent – and the percentage is still shrinking. If any charity overlooks the obvious ramifications this trend has for fundraising, they are going to miss out on substantial cumulative gifts from young donors.

At a bare minimum, your website should include a link to a PayPal account. If you fundraise through ticket sales of any kind, your site should also have an obvious link to an online ticketing platform, such as Eventbrite, EventZilla, or Event Smart. (Their names may be similar, but functions and fees vary. Do your research and find the tool that best matches your needs.) If cutting a check is required, some younger donors will simply spend their weekend and money elsewhere.

Mobile payments are another trend to watch. Apple Pay, the digital wallet platform launched by Apple Inc. in 2013, currently boasts about 90 percent of this market. Apple is presently focused on expanding commercial applications, but large nonprofits like the American Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, and St. Jude’s already use the platform.

Moreover, some forward-thinking libraries are already accepting Apple Pay for overdue fines. Friends and Foundations should keep on eye on this development.

mn-book-awards.jpgOn Saturday, April 21, book-lovers from all across Minnesota will descend on downtown Saint Paul for the 2018 Minnesota Book Awards ceremony. At this annual gala – the linchpin of the state literary community’s spring calendar – winners in each of the nine categories will be announced.

If you’ve flirted with the idea of attending in the past, make this the year! Tickets range from $40-$60 and are going fast. Your ticket includes wine and refreshments during the ceremony, and entry to the Epilogue After-Party at the end of the night.

Friends of the Library are invited, and encouraged, to book seats next to one another. Simply enter the name of your organization in the “Seating Preferences” space located at the bottom of the checkout form.

For the first time ever, the Minnesota Book Awards team have even added a special incentive to groups to reserve a table of ten. Book a full table, and your book club will be entered into an exclusive drawing to host an appearance by one of the 2018 finalist authors! Library book clubs and Friends of the Library are two constituencies with significant overlap, so we know this is a perk that will appeal to many of you!

Click here to read more about the book club contest, and call 651-366-3242 with any questions. Visit thefriends.org/ceremony to make a reservation. Seating is limited, so don’t delay!

Note: Did you know? The Minnesota Book Awards is organized by long-time MALF member The Friends of the Saint Paul Public Library, who serve as Minnesota’s state Center for the Book.

 

Mark Your Calendars: MLA 2018

Posted by jim on March 12, 2018

With another Library Legislative Day “in the books,” preparations for the Minnesota library community’s other tentpole event – the annual Minnesota Library Conference – are underway. Mark your calendars for October 11-12!

MALF is proud to continue is premier- level sponsorship of the MLA Conference, and to host a day-long programming track specific to the needs and interests of Friends of the Library. Full panel details will be made available this summer; registration opens August 1.

We sincerely hope you will join library staff, administrators, and Friends from across the state in Saint Cloud at the River’s Edge Convention Center. MALF members pay a reduced rate of $71 for entrance on Friends Day – if booked before the early bird deadline of September 5. Price for one-day Friend of the Library admission jumps to $93 after that date.

How Friends Attract Younger Donors, Pt. 1

Posted by jim on March 09, 2018

MALF is pleased to present this three-part miniseries on Millennial donors, adapted with permission from a piece originally prepared by and for Library Strategies, our office management firm. We know that this is a topic of great interest to our membership.

Nearly 85 percent of employed Millennials (age 18-34) donated to a charitable cause last year, according to a recent Millennial Impact Report. That’s impressive in itself – and doubly so when you factor in that America’s youngest working generation is also its largest. Eighty-five percent of Millennials translates to 67 million donors!

Furthermore, data from a recent, “buzzy” Pew Research Center report certifies what front-line librarians have been saying for years: Millennials are active and proud library users, and (on the whole) use their local library more often than older generations. In short, if your Friends organization is not courting the largesse of these younger donors, you are almost surely leaving money on the table.

What’s the catch?

Millennials choose their causes, and how much to give, based on patterns and preferences that may come as a curveball to any fundraiser versed in what’s “tried and true” among older givers. Savvy library support organizations must learn both the best practices and faux pas of this new giving landscape.

Offer “Participatory” Giving Opportunities.

According to the Millennial Impact Report cited earlier, an astounding 64 percent of young people have participated (actively or passively) in a walk, run or cycle event for charity. Collectively, nonprofits netted an estimated $1.2 billion through such events in 2012 alone. That’s nearly double what participatory giving opportunities brought in back in 2002.

Young donors are disproportionately represented here, and the reasons for that are twofold. Young adults are not as affluent as their parents and grandparents. Participatory giving opportunities along the “Fun Run” model allow young people to give as little as $5.00 to a friend’s race fund, and still feel the peer affirmation and vicarious commitment of the person they are donating “through.” Under other circumstances, the donor might not view such a gift as appreciated or worth the effort.

Second, participatory giving opportunities allow a young donor unable to contribute substantial funds to have a comparable impact by freely offering their time and enthusiasm instead. (Unsurprisingly, parents and grandparents are oftentimes big contributors.)

Ramsey County Public Library in Minnesota and Person County Public Library in North Carolina are among the many who have had recent success with “Fun Runs.” Others add a fresh, library twist. Read-a-thons and overnight lock-ins have proven equally effective at marshaling pledges.

Emphasize Cause Over Organization.

This is a generation who thinks critically about who they give to and what impact their dollar is having. Furthermore, compared to their parents, few young donors are “brand loyal” – they will jump ship if another charity with an allied mission looks to be more effective.

For these reasons, mammoth nonprofits with multi-pronged missions have had trouble attracting and retaining younger donors in recent years. It’s not always easy for an organization like United Way to trace a clear line between donation and dividend.

Library support organizations should not expect young donors to rally to them “because libraries need our support.” Instead, cite the added value the Library is able to offer to the community because of private donations routed through the Friends or Foundation. For example: “Your donation of [$x] will allow us to add [x] new titles to our recently expanded children’s area.”

Assuming the money will be put towards the same purpose regardless, employing special asks for specific needs is the perfect way to harness this “cause over organization” mentality.

Hypothetical examples are sometimes appropriate, if based on sound math. In an end-of-year appeal, this might take the form of “In 2016, you donated [$x]. That’s the cost equivalent of [xx] one-on-one tutoring sessions at the Library or [xx]…”

2018 Innovations in Reading Prize: Apply Today!

Posted by jim on February 16, 2018

Untitled.jpgLast year, entrepreneur and social justice speaker Alvin Irby made waves with “Barbershop Books”: a grassroots movement to encourage young boys of color to read to their neighborhood barber in exchange for a free or discounted haircut. CNN, MSNBC, NPR and a host of other media outlets recently ran glowing stories on the positive community impact Barbershop Books is having. Irby and his colleagues owed that boost, in part, to the National Book Foundation, who bestowed its 2017 Innovations in Reading Prize to Barbershop Books.

Has your Friends of the Library group created, or contributed to, a new and innovative reading initiative over the past year? If so, the National Book Foundation wants YOU to put forward your program or project for consideration as part of the 2018 Innovations in Reading Prize cycle.

Parameters are relatively broad, provided your program “sustains a lifelong love of reading.” Five groups and projects will be honored at the 2018 Why Reading Matters Conference. Top prize also receives $10,000! Applications can be submitted online. Submit yours by February 28.

Minnesota Library Legislative Day Registration Opens!

Posted by jim on February 06, 2018

In today’s uncertain budgetary climate, it is more important than ever to advocate for the public resources we hold dear. If you are reading this, it’s safe to assume that libraries make your personal list!

We hope you will join MALF, MLA, and library supporters from all across the state on March 5-6 for 2018 Minnesota Library Legislative Day. Held each year at the Capitol, this is our best opportunity all year round to turn out in force and state a case for robust library funding in front of our elected representatives.

Festivities kick off at the Roseville Public Library on Monday, March 5 with an evening briefing focused on challenges and goals this congressional term. Optional dinner opportunities will follow. Registrants will meet in small groups with their reps on the following day, per usual.
 Click here to register!

In preparation for this year’s festivities, organizers have rolled out a brand new website. This new resource offers a wealth of valuable data: legislative updates, an itinerary, talking points, and a “tool kit” for success on the Big Day. Be sure to check it out!