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MALF connects Friends of Library organizations, provides valuable resources to support their work, and is a strong voice for Friends of Library groups and libraries throughout Minnesota.

 

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'Minnesota Writers Directory' Now Live

Posted by jim on March 12, 2019

One in four Evy Nordley Award candidate projects includes a Minnesota author as a keynote speaker, panelist, or sponsor. That stat alone is a compelling proof that partnership opportunities abound between Friends of the Library and the state’s grassroots literary community.

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As we all know, however, brainstorming author programs and actually bringing them to fruition can be different things entirely. The Minnesota Center for the Book is endeavoring to bridge that gap with a free and first-of-its kind writers directory.

Aptly named the Minnesota Writers Directory, this interactive database allows users to ascertain, at a glance, whether a given author is available for library talks, writer workshops, special fundraisers, book club gatherings, school visits, and more. It also provides contact details for the author in question (or their booking agent or publicist, as appropriate). You can hone your search by county of residence, writing genre, target age demographic, or past accolades like a Minnesota Book Award.

Minnesota Center for the Book is a designation bestowed on The Friends of the Saint Paul Public (FSPPL) by the Library of Congress. Per federal requirements, each state contains a Center for the Book. However, Minnesota is one of only a handful of instances where the recognized organization is a nonprofit – and the only instance where a Friends group holds the distinction.

MALF is pleased to present this two-part miniseries on Friends leadership recruitment, adapted with permission from a piece originally prepared by and for Library Strategies, our office management firm. We've heard from you, our members, that this is a topic of great and increasing importance.

When a Friends or Foundation board looks for new directors, it can be tempting to prioritize deep pockets over all else. It’s an understandable impulse. After all, fundraising is a major part of our “raison d’être,” and most nonprofit boards boast an 80%+ giving rate.  

Even so, board donations alone will never sustain your organization. As you vet new directors, consider other assets candidates could bring to the table to further your mission. Specifically, don’t overlook potential directors who fit one of these four profiles.

1) Curtain Raisers. No matter how well-networked you are, odds are that you yourself do not know everyone in the community who might be receptive to aiding your organization in some big way. Whether you are seeking more large donations, new leaders to fill upcoming vacancies – or, more likely still, some combination – turn to your board’s Curtain Raisers.

Put simply, Curtain Raisers facilitate new connections; these adroit networkers are your best bet for reaching as-yet-untapped contributors. Studies have conclusively shown that in-person, one-on-one asks from a passionate personal connection are the best way to increase your fundraising and recruitment reach.

You can get the most out of your Curtain Raisers by doing two things. First, actively identify areas in which they can help. (“We are $5k short of our campaign goal. Do you know anyone who might bridge that gap for us?” “Our treasurer’s term is up next year, and we don’t have a finance person on deck to replace her. Do you know anyone?”) Second, as problems or opportunities arise, be receptive to their referrals and encourage them to reach out to strong prospects (“I might know someone who can help…”)

2) Friend Raisers. Friend Raisers (alternatively known as “Cheerleaders”) are much like Curtain Raisers in several key respects. They boast a robust network and are willing to tap into it to benefit your organization. However, whereas Curtain Raisers are invaluable in securing sizable donations or long-term commitments, Friend Raisers cast a wider net and are valuable allies in furtherance of one-off or shorter-term programming and publicity efforts.

If your Friends group or Foundation hosts special events of any kind – be they ticketed galas, free library programs, or one-off parties to celebrate a major milestone of some kind – look to your Friend Raisers. They will drum up attendants who might not otherwise have heard of your programs, and – just as critically – stoke enthusiasm among those who are within your sphere but may not have turned out otherwise.

Attending an in-library author reading, annual gala, or even a well-orchestrated used book sale represents a minimal commitment on the part of those approached. However, if you leave a positive and lasting impression, you may sow the seeds for a donation (or time commitment) at a later date.

What of the other two psychographic profiles, Barn Raisers and Consciousness Raisers? Keep your eyes peeled for our next e-newsletter!

Remembering Joan B. Larson

Posted by jim on March 05, 2019

MALF honors the life and memory of Joan B. Larson, who passed away February 23 at the age of 89.

Long-time library staff and supporters may remember Larson best as head of the Northern Lights Library Network – a cooperative of 280 public, school and special libraries in northern Minnesota. Under Larson's leadership, the consortium pooled valuable administrative, technological, and educational support services for the betterment of all.

However, she was also a staunch Friends leader, both at the local and state level. Larson served for a full ten years on the Minnesota Association of Library Friends board. Among other priorities, she was a driving force behind MALF’s first foray into Literary Landmarks™ – starting with the dedication of the Sinclair Lewis boyhood homestead in Sauk Centre (2013).

On top of MALF, Joan contributed her time and energy to a dizzying litany of like-minded organizations: her local Douglas County Friends and Foundation; the Minnesota Library Association (of which she was president); the Minnesota Reading Coalition; and the American Library Association / United for Libraries.

MALF named Joan as its
 'Library Friend of the Year' in 2014, and the Minnesota Library Association singled her out with a Distinguished Achievement Award in 2009. She will be missed! Family asks that, in lieu of flowers, charitable gifts be given in Joan’s name to the Douglas County Library Friends and Foundation. [Obituary]

No National Library Legislative Day (NLLD) in 2019

Posted by jim on February 26, 2019

For many years running, the American Library Association has hosted its own advocacy “holiday” in Washington D.C.: the aptly named National Library Legislative Day (NLLD). ALA’s Washington Office is taking a break in 2019… on paper, anyway.
 
Our nation’s capital will play host to ALA’s Annual Conference from June 20-25 – just weeks after NLLD typically falls. For that reason, advocacy activities will be folded into ALA’s flagship event, which is expected to draw 25,000+ attendees.

Click here to learn more about the Conference (including scholarship opportunities), and expect NLLD proper back in 2020!

Not everyone can converge on the Capitol on February 26. Work obligations, busy personal schedules, and (dare we say it) weather make it impractical. For this reason, Legislative Day organizers are orchestrating a virtual counterpart to the big event.
 
Virtual Library Legislative Week runs February 25 – March 1, and there are no shortage of ways to “celebrate.” MLA’s Advocacy particularly recommends the following:
 
1. Review (and, if desired, research further) the issues and talking points collected by MLA here. If you don’t know who represents you at the state or federal level, not to worry: just click here!
 
2. Draft an email. MLA has helpfully collected all Minnesota legislators’ contact information here to help make that easy. These do get read, and it can make a difference!
 
3. Punctuate those points by calling their offices. You will likely speak to an aide; but don’t be discouraged. Well-placed aides often have great sway with elected representatives. You can peruse a customizable sample call script here.

4. Want to cover all your bases? Give your favorite library-related bill or funding priority a quick shout out on social media. It might surprise you how many legislators are on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.