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How Friends Attract & Retain Young Donors, Pt. 3

MALF is pleased to present this three-part miniseries on Millennial donors, adapted with permission from a piece originally prepared by and for Library Strategies, our office management firm. We've heard from you, our members, that this is a topic of great and increasing importance.

Tip 4: Don't "Be On" Social Media. Use Social Media.

Invest time and energy in the three core social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. However, be aware of an all too-common fundraising pitfall.

Nonprofits – particularly small ones and those who’ve traditionally catered to older donors – often excitedly turn to social media, but immediately become disenchanted when the donations do not effortlessly poor in. They delete their Facebook and Twitter or simply let the organization’s social media presence go dormant.

This misses the point entirely. Although - as we discussed in detail in Part 2 - they are practitioners of online and mobile giving, Millennials want something different from social media. Instead of a fundraising organ, think of social media as a storytelling and relationship building tool. Young donors follow institutions because they want to hear about their mission in action. Repeated exposure to positive messages makes these individuals more receptive to “asks” over the long term. Is this ideal for your purposes? Perhaps not – but think long term. Eighty-eight percent of Americans aged 18-29 use Facebook, and 76 percent of Facebook users turn to the site daily.

Do you really want to miss out on this time and attention?