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Public Libraries and Net Neutrality

Free, equitable access to information is a bedrock principle which all public libraries share. In the digital sphere, that equal access is safeguarded by “net neutrality.” In brief, net neutrality is a legal doctrine which forces internet service providers to treat all online data the same, regardless of user or site content.

Without existing net neutrality protections, cable and DSL companies can "stack the deck" by providing faster connections to favored websites and restricting access to in-demand web resources at will.

On Thursday, December 14, the Federal Communications Commission will vote to repeal those protections. Between now and this critical vote, the American Library Association strongly recommends that library advocates across the country contact the FCC and petition for the continuation of the existing net neutrality policy.  

“Now that the internet has become the primary mechanism for delivering information, services and applications to the general public, it is especially important that commercial internet service providers are not able to control or manipulate the content of these communications. Libraries, our patrons, and America’s communities will be at risk if the FCC repeals all protections contained in its 2015 Open Internet Order with no plans to replace with any enforceable rules.” (Click here to read the full statement.)

Making your voice heard only takes a minute. Please consider signing petitions at 
Change.org and Whitehouse.gov